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Project Focus Engine bay before & after
Engine detail before and after - see how we detail a focus engine bay stage by stage.


back

This is the engine before we started work with the stainless / chrome and aluminium goodies. As you can see its all looking a little bit tired and in need of some TLC. You will also notice that it?s all just a little bit too ... well ... plastic

Here?s how to fix that ...
This is the engine before we started work with the stainless / chrome and aluminium goodies. As you can see its all looking a little bit tired and in need of some TLC. You will also notice that itís all just a little bit too ... well ... plastic

Hereís how to fix that ...
This is the end result of a few hours work and now we will explain step by step how its done.

You will need a few basic tools to do this work but if you have a bit of patience and know the basics of how the engine works you can do all the work yourself.
This is the end result of a few hours work and now we will explain step by step how its done.

You will need a few basic tools to do this work but if you have a bit of patience and know the basics of how the engine works you can do all the work yourself.
First up we’re going to tackle fitting the 12 under bonnet stainless steel plates. We recommend removing the bonnet so you can bond the plates more easily, but as we’ve got a whole engine bay to do we’re leaving it in place.
First up we’re going to tackle fitting the 12 under bonnet stainless steel plates. We recommend removing the bonnet so you can bond the plates more easily, but as we’ve got a whole engine bay to do we’re leaving it in place.
After you’ve removed the sound-deadening and before you get the adhesive out, make sure you know where each plate goes because they are designed for specific sides of the bonnet, otherwise it could get messy. Next, apply some adhesive - the stuff which we supply even withstands heat - and keep the plate under pressure until the adhesive goes off. If you’re keeping the bonnet in-situ then it’s worth either having a mate with a long attention span of gaffa-taping a block of wood to the plate to keep it in place and under pressure.
After you’ve removed the sound-deadening and before you get the adhesive out, make sure you know where each plate goes because they are designed for specific sides of the bonnet, otherwise it could get messy. Next, apply some adhesive - the stuff which we supply even withstands heat - and keep the plate under pressure until the adhesive goes off. If you’re keeping the bonnet in-situ then it’s worth either having a mate with a long attention span of gaffa-taping a block of wood to the plate to keep it in place and under pressure.
While the bonding agent is setting we can set about the rest of the engine bay. The next thing we’re going to work on is the cam cover but as everything’s so tightly packaged in here, we have to start by removing the header tank from the offside inner wing and putting it out of the way.
While the bonding agent is setting we can set about the rest of the engine bay. The next thing we’re going to work on is the cam cover but as everything’s so tightly packaged in here, we have to start by removing the header tank from the offside inner wing and putting it out of the way.
This now gives a clear access to the offside engine mount which you need to remove - just remember to support the engine’s weight using a trolley jack and a lump of wood so that the sump doesn’t get damaged.
This now gives a clear access to the offside engine mount which you need to remove - just remember to support the engine’s weight using a trolley jack and a lump of wood so that the sump doesn’t get damaged.
Almost there, unclip the power-steering fluid reservoir from the strut tower and move it out of the way so that you can access the timing gear cover and remove it.
Almost there, unclip the power-steering fluid reservoir from the strut tower and move it out of the way so that you can access the timing gear cover and remove it.
Now remove the spark plug leads and undo the bolts which secure the cam cover - remember to double check that all the bolts have been undone and that the breather hose has been disconnected before you start trying to lever off the cover...
Now remove the spark plug leads and undo the bolts which secure the cam cover - remember to double check that all the bolts have been undone and that the breather hose has been disconnected before you start trying to lever off the cover...
This is our prototype cam cover unfortunately we haven’t been able to produce it due to the mould complications.

To give it added impact, we’ve replaced the Ford bolts with shiny stainless steel ones.
This is our prototype cam cover unfortunately we haven’t been able to produce it due to the mould complications.

To give it added impact, we’ve replaced the Ford bolts with shiny stainless steel ones.
Refit the plug leads but don’t clip them into place yet, instead fit the billet aluminium spacers which support and secure the plug lead cover. When these are in place rearrange the leads around the spacers and clip down, before fitting the cover and securing it.
Refit the plug leads but don’t clip them into place yet, instead fit the billet aluminium spacers which support and secure the plug lead cover. When these are in place rearrange the leads around the spacers and clip down, before fitting the cover and securing it.
Now it’s the turn of the stainless cambelt cover which again we’ve fitted with some stainless bolts, before refitting the offside engine mount. Remember to jack may have slumped a bit, so you might have to fiddle to get the bolt holes correctly lined up - and take care to avoid cross-threading. Next, clip the power-steering fluid reservoir back onto the strut tower and remove the jack.
Now it’s the turn of the stainless cambelt cover which again we’ve fitted with some stainless bolts, before refitting the offside engine mount. Remember to jack may have slumped a bit, so you might have to fiddle to get the bolt holes correctly lined up - and take care to avoid cross-threading. Next, clip the power-steering fluid reservoir back onto the strut tower and remove the jack.
To save time, we’re not going to bleed the entire cooling system. instead we’re removing the two top hoses from the header tank, tilting onto it’s side, clamping the bottom hose (no, those are not scissors) before disconnecting it.
To save time, we’re not going to bleed the entire cooling system. instead we’re removing the two top hoses from the header tank, tilting onto it’s side, clamping the bottom hose (no, those are not scissors) before disconnecting it.
Keep hold of the bottom hose so you do not spill any coolant, attach it to the new polished alloy header tank, remove the clamp, reattach the top hoses and secure it to the inner wing.
Keep hold of the bottom hose so you do not spill any coolant, attach it to the new polished alloy header tank, remove the clamp, reattach the top hoses and secure it to the inner wing.
Refill the header tank with coolant before the bonding the stainless steel cap cover to the original Ford part. The cover over the cap is a very tight groove-fitting but by adding a spot of adhesive it just makes it more permanent mod.
Refill the header tank with coolant before the bonding the stainless steel cap cover to the original Ford part. The cover over the cap is a very tight groove-fitting but by adding a spot of adhesive it just makes it more permanent mod.
The next item due for smartening up is the power-steering fluid reservoir. Remove the top and bond the stainless steel shoulder collar to the bottle.
The next item due for smartening up is the power-steering fluid reservoir. Remove the top and bond the stainless steel shoulder collar to the bottle.
Then refit the top and bond the stainless steel finisher to the top of the reservoir - see, that’s much better.
Then refit the top and bond the stainless steel finisher to the top of the reservoir - see, that’s much better.
Swapping the existing lifting eyes for a set of stainless ones is a straightforward unbolt, bolt-up job. However, when tackling the lifting eyes on the front right-hand side of the engine, after we have bolted it on, we cut off the rest of the stud so that when it comes to fitting the polished exhaust heat-shield we can use a domed stainless nut.
Swapping the existing lifting eyes for a set of stainless ones is a straightforward unbolt, bolt-up job. However, when tackling the lifting eyes on the front right-hand side of the engine, after we have bolted it on, we cut off the rest of the stud so that when it comes to fitting the polished exhaust heat-shield we can use a domed stainless nut.
The dipstick is next under the spotlight, so first we have to remove it before taking out the tube by unbolting it and giving it a good tug...
The dipstick is next under the spotlight, so first we have to remove it before taking out the tube by unbolting it and giving it a good tug...
Before we go any further with the dipstick we’re going to banish that horrid great brown worm otherwise known as an exhaust manifold. We know there’s usually a heat shield fitted but they tend to look like the sort of tarnished metal ducting you see sticking out the back of your local Indian takeaway. We can polish your existing Ford heat shield or supply a brand new stainless steel one. Anyway, with the shield in place it’s time to return to the dipstick...
Before we go any further with the dipstick we’re going to banish that horrid great brown worm otherwise known as an exhaust manifold. We know there’s usually a heat shield fitted but they tend to look like the sort of tarnished metal ducting you see sticking out the back of your local Indian takeaway. We can polish your existing Ford heat shield or supply a brand new stainless steel one. Anyway, with the shield in place it’s time to return to the dipstick...
Stick the end of the stainless tube in the engine block - a torch and a bit of patience is required for this bit - then secure it in place. Now it’s the turn of the dipstick itself, we cut off the top three-quarters of the plastic handle, leaving something for the new one to get a hold on.
Stick the end of the stainless tube in the engine block - a torch and a bit of patience is required for this bit - then secure it in place. Now it’s the turn of the dipstick itself, we cut off the top three-quarters of the plastic handle, leaving something for the new one to get a hold on.
Even though it’s a nice tight fit, the handle is then made fast by a tiny securing grub-screw.
Even though it’s a nice tight fit, the handle is then made fast by a tiny securing grub-screw.
Making the brake fluid reservoir shine is a nice simple job. Remove the sensor by undoing the cap, before removing the reservoir bottle from the bulkhead.
Making the brake fluid reservoir shine is a nice simple job. Remove the sensor by undoing the cap, before removing the reservoir bottle from the bulkhead.
Place the cover over the bottle whilst it’s in situ, secure it back onto the bulkhead, then replace the top and sensor.
Place the cover over the bottle whilst it’s in situ, secure it back onto the bulkhead, then replace the top and sensor.
Finally, fit a stainless finisher which is secured by double-sided numberplate tape.
Finally, fit a stainless finisher which is secured by double-sided numberplate tape.
Next, while you’ve got the numberplate tape handy, attach the fuel rail cover to hide the ugly black plastic housing and add more impact to the gleaming engine.
Next, while you’ve got the numberplate tape handy, attach the fuel rail cover to hide the ugly black plastic housing and add more impact to the gleaming engine.
By now the number of goodies left is dwindling, as we tackle the fuse box cover located on the nearside of the engine bay, and one of the last predominantly plastic areas. Simply get your goo-gun out and bond it to the existing cover.
By now the number of goodies left is dwindling, as we tackle the fuse box cover located on the nearside of the engine bay, and one of the last predominantly plastic areas. Simply get your goo-gun out and bond it to the existing cover.
Talking of easy modifications, replace the cap of the windscreen washer bottle by pulling off the original and replacing with this shiny one instead. The only thing to remember here, is that by applying a bit of grease to the rubber seal you’ll make life a lot easier for yourself.
Talking of easy modifications, replace the cap of the windscreen washer bottle by pulling off the original and replacing with this shiny one instead. The only thing to remember here, is that by applying a bit of grease to the rubber seal you’ll make life a lot easier for yourself.
The air filter housing is next, so unplug your MAS (Mass Airflow Sensor) but make sure that the ignition is switched off otherwise the electronics will get confused and your dash lights will light up like a disco. Then remove the entire airbox - it’s simple - it just pulls out because there aren’t any fittings and replace it with a cone-filter shield.
The air filter housing is next, so unplug your MAS (Mass Airflow Sensor) but make sure that the ignition is switched off otherwise the electronics will get confused and your dash lights will light up like a disco. Then remove the entire airbox - it’s simple - it just pulls out because there aren’t any fittings and replace it with a cone-filter shield.
To fit the shield you have to remove two of the nuts from the gearbox mounting - don’t worry the box shouldn’t budge an inch.
To fit the shield you have to remove two of the nuts from the gearbox mounting - don’t worry the box shouldn’t budge an inch.
The studs from the gearbox mount fit through the shield, then secured by refastening the nuts. Reinstall the airflow sensor to the ducting and feed the end of it through the filter shield.
The studs from the gearbox mount fit through the shield, then secured by refastening the nuts. Reinstall the airflow sensor to the ducting and feed the end of it through the filter shield.
Then fit a new performance filter, reconnect the MAS and tighten up the jubilee clip. Brighten up the airflow sensor with a metal finisher.
Then fit a new performance filter, reconnect the MAS and tighten up the jubilee clip. Brighten up the airflow sensor with a metal finisher.
Right, now it’s the turn of the last big plastic eyesore to be sorted - the battery cover. Take the new cover and simply fit with super-strong double-sided numberplate tape.
Right, now it’s the turn of the last big plastic eyesore to be sorted - the battery cover. Take the new cover and simply fit with super-strong double-sided numberplate tape.
The strut top finishers are next. Remove the three strut securing nuts, fit the stainless finishers and re-secure with the original, nuts before fitting three domed, dressing nuts. Oh and don’t forget to do the other side.
The strut top finishers are next. Remove the three strut securing nuts, fit the stainless finishers and re-secure with the original, nuts before fitting three domed, dressing nuts. Oh and don’t forget to do the other side.
At this point you’re probably feeling pretty chuffed with yourself, but as you’re almost there you’d better crack on with it. The slam-panel is just about the only area left which needs addressing, so on go three slivers of stainless.
At this point you’re probably feeling pretty chuffed with yourself, but as you’re almost there you’d better crack on with it. The slam-panel is just about the only area left which needs addressing, so on go three slivers of stainless.
Then we finally swap the bonnet stay for something more in keeping with the Focus’s new image.

Hey Presto job done
Then we finally swap the bonnet stay for something more in keeping with the Focus’s new image.

Hey Presto job done
All that leaves is for you to remove the gaffer tape, wooden blocks and protective plastic sheeting on the underbonnet steel plates. Now, simply grab your shades and sit back, relax and bask in your own smugness.
All that leaves is for you to remove the gaffer tape, wooden blocks and protective plastic sheeting on the underbonnet steel plates. Now, simply grab your shades and sit back, relax and bask in your own smugness.